Flying Cars Are Now Legal In This US State

9 hours ago by Martin Bigg Concept

This is one step closer to making flying cars a reality.

While many manufacturers are researching self-driving technology to make cars safer, others are looking further ahead into the future, envisioning a world where flying cars roam the skies and city traffic congestion is a distant memory. Numerous flying car concepts have been announced over the years. As well as revolutionizing the electric car industry with the Taycan, Porsche is even building a flying car concept with Boeing. Some flying car concepts such as the ItalDesign's Pop.Up. have even been shown off at motor shows, but none of them have entered production.

However, the dream of flying cars has now reached one step closer to reality, as New Hampshire has become the first US state to allow flying cars to legally drive on public roads.

The law was passed when Gov. Chris Sununu signed the HB 1182 transportation bill into law. It's important to note, however, that this doesn't mean you'll be seeing flying cars hovering above you on the highway during your commute to work. Instead, the law permits pilots to drive flying cars on public roads to an airport before taking to the skies.

Still, it is a step in the right direction for the flying car industry. One company that's aiming to put a flying car into production is Samson Sky. The company has already received hundreds of customer orders for the Switchblade, a flying sports car with a 190-hp, 1.6-liter V4 engine driving a rear propeller.

When airborne, the Switch can cruise at 13,000 feet and reach a top speed of 200 mph. Operators are required to hold a pilot's license and driver's license.

The Switchblade was supposed to be ready for take off last year, but the project still hasn't got off the ground. However, Samson Sky is still accepting orders for the Switchblade with an estimated starting price of $120,000. "This is a landmark event, and early adopters of this type of state legislation will be the leaders of a new transportation technology," said Sam Bousfield, CEO of Samson Sky. "This is something the public has been yearning for decades to see."